How Mountain Gorillas grow up-Uganda Safari News

silver back gorillaMountain gorillas are charming apes considered to be critical endangered world species which if not protected and conserved, they can totally suffer extinction. It’s approximated that 880 gorillas are living in the wild and half of the total gorilla population lives in Uganda’s Bwindi national park and the other half is shared by the three national parks of Volcanoes national park in Rwanda, Virunga National Park in Congo and Mgahinga National Park in Uganda. Knowing how these interesting apes grow is very much important to any world reader and potential travelers planning gorilla trekking safaris to Uganda.
As matter of fact, experienced female gorillas which can be encountered on Uganda gorilla tour in particular don’t mind a lot about their offspring apart from carrying, grooming, nursing as well as protecting them. Usually in the first few months after giving birth, a young gorilla is consistently in direct contact with its mother and this starts to reduce at the latest in the baby’s 4th or 5th month, when it begins to walk quadrupedally. At first the mother supports the Young baby with one hand, but even on its first day it can cling to her fur without help for a certain period of time.
In general, gorilla babies are nursed for at least 2 years. At 4-6 of months, they begin to test plant parts by putting them into their mouth and to bite on them. At 8 months, they regularly swallow solid food. At an estimated age of 3 years, young gorillas begin to survive on their own because their mother gives birth to the next baby. In spite of this, older offspring and mother maintain strong ties.
From the first day young gorilla is born, the baby becomes part of the group and can also be watched by trekkers on Gorilla trekking safaris in Uganda. Under the control and protection of the mother. From there, it slowly grows into the community. As soon as the mother permits the others to approach, they will look at the newborn baby, smell and touch it. At latest when the young gorilla starts moving away from its mother, the other animals seize the opportunity to make contact with it. Usually, adult gorillas will hold, carry and groom the infant, while young gorillas will try to play with them.
When female gorillas reach sexual maturity, they develop a hormone cycle similar to that of human females. Female mountain gorillas can ovulate for the first time when they are about 8 years old, but usually the first ovulation happens in their 10th year. Captive gorillas usually reach sexual maturity faster, sometimes in their 6th year. By comparison, girls of western industrialized countries reach sexual maturity at 12 years at the earliest. This makes mountain gorillas trekking safaris in Uganda more than interesting because they allow trekkers to learn more about the mountain gorillas in their natural environment of Bwindi Impenetrable or Mgahinga National Park.
Reaching adulthood, female gorillas usually leave the group they were born in and join a new partner and that is why habituated gorillas groups in Uganda’s Gorilla safari destination of Bwindi or Mgahinga keep changing. In their choice of males, gorilla females can be quite particular: Usually they transfer to a new group several times before they settle down with a certain silver-back male.
In male gorillas, puberty extends over several years. This is when a black back male turns into a silver-back – the silvery back, the huge canines and the other secondary sexual characteristics develop. When exactly males reach sexual maturity has not yet been determined. In captivity, occasionally individuals just under 7 years old turn out to be fertile.
In order to know more about mountain gorillas, one has only one option that is to undertake gorilla trekking safaris to Uganda’ s Bwindi Impenetrable or Mgahinga gorilla national park.
Uganda Safaris/Uganda Safari News
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